Archive for November 1st, 2013

November 1, 2013

Silence, the biggest killer in the Pacific!

Words from Orakidorm

By Stevenson Kuartei

Two days ago (Oct. 19) here in American Samoa, the LBJ Tropical Medical Center, their only hospital, and the Department of Health held a medical symposium, the first one ever between the two entities. The morning topic was on the burden of Diabetes in the Territory and in the afternoon was series of topics on human resource development in health. The data shared in the morning by the local presenters was overwhelming. For example, the rate of Diabetes in the Territory is 47% and youngest person was 12 years old. The cost of taking care of it is skyrocketing and the rates of off-island referral and hemodialysis are increasing every year. As I thought about this, I could not help but feel this sadness because the very same thing is happening in Palau.

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November 1, 2013

Siasing er kid

By Gaafar J. Uherbelau —-

So the past couple of weeks I’ve been critical about our nation, trying to shed light on issues that I believe need our attention. But I also think we need to take time to acknowledge some interesting facts about our nation as well as our achievements over the years since our beginnings as a republic.

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November 1, 2013

Defusing Loan Stressors in Palau

By Jackson M. Henry —-

Life on Palau, in the eyes of our foreign visitors impervious to Palauan cultural duties, is probably the closest they see an ideal society similar to what British author, Sir Thomas More wrote in his famous book, Utopia. Life on a paradise island appears free of the stresses that come with big city living.

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November 1, 2013

HCF is big and good policy

Tia Belau Editorial, October 16, 2013 —- 

History tells us that it is too much to expect every government to finish up its term with a profound public policy that improves social and economic circumstances of its citizens.

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November 1, 2013

Thank you, Oreor!!!

By Fuana Tmarsel —-

Happy Anniversary to Oreor and the people of Oreor!  Thank you for the many years you have given us a place on which to build our dwelling, to finish our elementary and secondary education. As a young child, Oreor was a place of fascination – where I first saw a motor cycle, a pick-up truck, and ice box. I remember the man on a motor cycle who sold red ice-keki and tama. As I look back on my childhood, I recall the trips my father took to Oreor. On the day of his return,  I would run to the hill and watch his boat approach our shore, expecting to hear news of Oreor. Little did I know that one of those days, I was to make a trip to Oreor to stay.

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