Archive for April, 2011

April 29, 2011

President Toribiong’s SORA 2011

Text of President Johnson Toribiong’s 2011 Annual Progress Report Delivered to the Senate and House of Delegates of the Eighth Olbiil Era Kelulau on April 28, 2011

Reklai, Ibedul, Ebil Reklai, Bilung, Mr. Senate President and Honorable Senators, Mr. Speaker and Honorable Delegates of the Eighth Olbiil Era Kelulau, Distinguished members of the Diplomatic Corps, Honored guests, my fellow Palauans, Ladies and Gentlemen.

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April 27, 2011

Is Palau Ready For Offshore Banking?

By Jackson M. Henry

According to Nicholas Shaxon, Offshore Banks hold between $10 to $20 trillion in total cash deposits. Half of the world trades are processed through Offshore Banks, which makes them huge and drives power into the heart of global economy. 31% of the profits ofAmerica’s multi-national corporations and 26% of the world’s wealth are held in Offshore Banks. Switzerland and Cayman Islandare the powerhouses in Offshore Banking holding nearly 45% or about $10 trillion of all offshore accounts.

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April 25, 2011

2012 Election: Early List of Presidential Candidates

By Kambes Kesolei

Who is in and who is out in the field of 2012 election candidates? It’s a popular subject of discussion in offices, coffee-houses, and in the many social settings that takes place around the island.

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April 22, 2011

Breaking Palau’s Fear Barrier

By Jackson Henry

The news media drew world attention to Walter Breuning’s death on April 14 inGreat Falls,Montana. According to Gerontology Research Group, Walter held the record as the oldest man who ever lived. He was 114.Palaucan be inspired by Walter’s philosophy on life. Before his death, Walter revealed that one of his secrets to longevity is adapting to world changes. He said, “embrace change when change slaps you in the face. Change is good”.

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April 20, 2011

Anomie (Mla Obeu A Blatong)

By Santy Asanuma

Anomie sounds like a good Palauan Japanese name but I would not dare wish to be close to it nor name my daughter such God forsaken name. As a person who believes that there got to be a better explanation for everything in life, I am endlessly searching in my head for reasons why the world, especially Palau is becoming the way it is today. Most of all is why people act the way they do.

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April 18, 2011

Uniquely Palauan

By Kambes Kesolei

A question that is often asked, albeit  in various local settings as an intellectual exercise – and which I myself have pondered about countless times is “what makes you a Palauan?” Such question has no easy answer and is explored more in its abstract sense that in its physical form.

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April 15, 2011

Optimizing Palau’s Opportunities in Europe

By Jackson Henry

“With six Russian tourists billeted at the Palasia Hotel this week, that is a good indication thatPalauhas a chance inEurope”, said a Palauan Rubak, while observing the human traffic in the hotel lobby. That optimistic Rubak echoes sentiments of many other Palauans who say that, forPalauto move up the ladder of success, we must not limit ourselves to “fishing around the mangroves forest for tiny fishes”. Instead, we must have the passion and the courage to “go fishing far out on the high seas to catch the big Blue Marlins”.

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April 14, 2011

Belau of No Arithmetic plus No Class

By Santy Asanuma

The fault is not individual as much as it is societal (ng mocha kengtil a beluu). Being schooled (ngar ngii a skuled) and good behavior is no longer significant qualities to posses in order to do well in Palau. This is very obvious in electing people to public office without holding higher level of writing and reading or at least prominence in character built on individual accomplishment and good reputation in life I would call class.

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April 10, 2011

Maximizing Palau’s Benefits with Open Ship Registry

By Jackson M. Henry

Palau applauds the 8th OEK and the Toribiong administration for having approved the Open Ship Registry Bill into law, after years of languishing in the previous OEKs. 

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April 7, 2011

Trafficking Profile – Palau

Palau has a population of 14,000 Palauans and 5-6,000 foreign workers (including about 400 Bangladeshi workers, who have reported TIP cases to the police).  Bangladeshis work on farms, in domestic work, as laborers, houseboys, gardeners, and in poultry (chicken farms).  Many recruited to work in Palau pay $3,000 in fees to recruiters who coach the migrants to enter the country as tourists, and tell also them that Palau is a U.S. territory.
April 7, 2011

PALAU (Tier 2) – Trafficking in Persons Report: 2010

http://www.state.gov/g/tip/rls/tiprpt/2010/142761.htm

Palau is a transit and destination country for a undetermined, but relatively small, number of women from countries in the Asia-Pacific region who are subjected to trafficking in persons, specifically forced prostitution and, to a lesser extent, men from the Philippines, China, and Bangladesh who are in conditions of forced labor. Some employers recruit foreign men and women to work in Palau through fraudulent representation of contract terms and conditions of employment. These foreign workers willingly migrate to Palau for jobs in domestic service, agriculture, or construction but are subsequently coerced to work in situations significantly different than what their contracts stipulated – excessive hours without pay, threats of physical or financial harm, confiscation of their travel documents, and the withholding of salary payments are used as tools of coercion to obtain and maintain their compelled service. Some women migrate to Palau expecting to work as waitresses or clerks, but are subsequently forced into prostitution in karaoke bars and massage parlors. Non-citizens are officially excluded from the minimum wage law making them vulnerable to involuntary servitude and debt bondage.

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April 6, 2011

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If you have been commenting but don’t see your comment get published, send me an email:

alekokau(at)gmail(dot)com

Kambes

April 6, 2011

Adelbai Repeat for Knowledge

By Santy Asanuma

Mr. Adelbai was on to something when he taught English to young Palauan students in the 1950’s when most Palauans were still struggling to get used to the language of their new American administrators. Imagine the omelenguul (talk down on someone) that we Palauans are used to when we are new to something. Nothing is left behind and the laughing is demeaning (ke de mekelemolm er ngii) enough to melt dry ice instantly. Mr. Adelbai made the students repeat everything incessantly and being smart alecks (te ko ra oumeiad er tir) they began to refer to him as Adelbai Repeat.

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April 4, 2011

We need actions from the leadership

By Kambes Kesolei

If you’ve been out around town lately you’ve no doubt noticed the price of gas has increased several times this year. If you’ve been going to the grocery store lately you’ve no doubt discovered that the price of most food has increased significantly. There’s plenty of blame to go around; increase of oil prices, electric rate hike, shipping surcharges, slow recovery of the world economy, and on and on.

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