Archive for March, 2011

March 31, 2011

COFA: Statement by President Toribiong at 2011 JCM

2011 JOINT COMMITTEE MEETING

STATEMENT BY JOHNSON TORIBIONG

PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF PALAU

Good morning.

I would like to start this 2011 Joint Committee Meeting by extending a warm welcome to

  • Her Excellency Helen Reed-Rowe, U.S Ambassador to Palau;
  • to Rear Admiral Paul J. Bushong, Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Marianas, Commander, Joint Region Marianas, and U.S. Defense Representative to Guam, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands the Federated States of Micronesia, and most importantly, to the Republic of Palau;
  • and to all of the members of the U.S. Delegation to the 2011 JCM Meeting in Palau.

Welcome to all of you.  I hope that you enjoy your stay in Palau, howsoever brief it may be.

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March 31, 2011

COFA: Statement by Ambassador Koshiba at 2011 JCM

2011 Joint Committee Meeting

Statement by Joshua Koshiba
Palau Ambassador and Chief Representative
for Compact 432 Review

The agenda submitted by the Republic of Palau for this 2011 Joint Committee Meeting lists a number of items for discussion.  As can be seen from the agenda, Palau’s highest priority for this session is to solicit the support of the United States Department of Defense for the Agreement signed by the United States and Palau in Hawaii on September 3, 2010, pursuant to Section 432 of the Compact of Free Association.  This is appropriate as everything we will be discussing at this meeting stems from the Compact.

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March 31, 2011

COFA: Sen. Bingaman’s Statement of Feb. 16, 2011

Senator Bingaman’s Statement of February 16, 2011
Accompanying the Introduction of S. 343

Mr. President, I am pleased to join with my colleague and the Ranking Member of the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, Lisa Murkowski, in introducing legislation to strengthen the relationship between the United States and the Republic of Palau–one of our closest and most reliable allies. This legislation, if enacted, would implement the recommendations of the 15-year review called for under the Compact of Free Association between our two nations.

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March 31, 2011

Aiming for “White Flag” Palau Classification

By Jackson Henry

With over 20,000 ships plying the oceans of the world, management and registration of these ships is a multi million dollar industry annually. Thanks to the Palau Open Ship Registry Law approved recently, Palau can now move to get a slice of this lucrative industry. Due to Palau’s delay in its passage, Marshall Islands zoomed ahead of us and now has over 2,000 ships in their registry earning some $20 millions yearly for the Marshallese. 

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March 30, 2011

Position of Special Prosecutor still vacant after one year

April 1 would mark one year anniversary since the Office of the Special Prosecutor became vacant. President Toribiong had nominated Ex-NMI assistant AG David Hutton for the office but to date no action has been taken by the Senate.

Hutton  served as chief prosecutor of the CNMI Attorney General’s Office from July 2002 to Sept. 2005. He is currently connected with the International Legal Consultants in Tennessee.

The position of special prosecutor was previously held by Michael Copeland, who resigned effective April 1, 2010.

Cross posted at Belau Examiner.

March 28, 2011

Skatanga-Nai (Ng Diak A Chiuoled Er Ngii)

By Santy Asanuma

The world needs to learn from the Japanese resilience (cherduch e outekangel el reng) and character in light of the cruel consequences fallen on the victims, especially under the mounting strenuous conditions of life that followed, after the devastating 8.9 earthquake and the killer tsunami that hit the northeastern region of Japan on March 11, 2011.

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March 25, 2011

A World in Shambles

By Fuana Tmarsel

We live in a century of man’s greatest accomplishments; technology is advancing at breakneck speed making possible many things that the genius of Einstein would have thought incomprehensible. Portable computers, and Touchscreens are exploding into consumer mainstream, electric cars have hit the market, and of course Internet networks gives many free access links to connect with friends and families across the ocean; never was there a time such as ours.

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March 23, 2011

The Power of Good Manners

By Jackson Henry

In the hustle and bustle of today business world, good manners become rare. Even here in Palau, complaints from both locals and visitors regarding bad manners are mounting. Take the case of the airport official processing incoming tourist at 2:00 in the morning. Extracting a smile from him or evoking proper mannerism becomes a difficult proposition at those wee-wee hours in morning. 

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March 21, 2011

Helping Japan is to help Palau

By Kambes Kesolei

In the tenets of diplomacy, extraordinary events calls for extraordinary leaders. The leaders of Palau – both political and traditional, are faced with a unique opportunity to respond to the human tragedy in Japan by returning in kind to assist the people of Japan and reassert Palau’s close ties with the people and the government of Japan.

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March 18, 2011

Treasonous Contempt (Dmak Ra Kemril)

By Santy Asanuma

There is no law after thirty years since the adoption of our constitution to deal with those who commit the highest crime against country-treason. Treason is labeled as the highest crime against country because it betrays the country to the point of overthrowing its government. Only in Article 10 Section 10 of our constitution it says, “a justice (judge) of the Supreme Court may be impeached only for the commission of treason, bribery, other high crimes, or improper practices, or on the grounds of his inability to discharge the function of his office” (diak el sebechel remuul a ngerchelel a obis er ngii).

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March 16, 2011

Is Palau an Ostrich?

By Fuana Tmarsel

Following is a reflection of my friend, Naoko. It is a critical message considering the scenes of carnage that has befallen many nations in the past months, most recently, our neighbor, Japan.

Is Palau an Ostrich?!

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March 14, 2011

Capitalizing On Palau’s Proximity To The Tigers Of Asia

By Jackson Henry

While Europe remains straddled with crushing debts and America is still sputtering from the sub-prime mortgage meltdown of 2008, Asia is zooming ahead. According to ADB, Asian economy grows at an average of 7% annually while the west grew at only 3%. By 2050, China will be the world’s largest economy with India second. Forbes magazine reported that Asia produced more billionaires in 2010 than any other countries.

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March 11, 2011

The Bulls and the Bears Set Palau’s Market Trends

By Jackson Henry

The economic history of capitalist nations, including Palau, is an endless tussle between bulls and bears. Bulls and bears are colorful names used by US investors to describe market activities, mostly in the Stock Market. Historians trace the origins of the names to the way these two animals attack their prey. Bull swipes their horns upward while bears claw their prey downward. Bulls rage and charge forward while bears tend to be slow, reclusive and prefer to avoid confrontations. Others believe the names came from trappers who sold bear skins to brokers during America’s frontier days.

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March 9, 2011

Chuab El Kedelbuu (The Beginning of Obesity)

By Santy Asanuma

Once upon a time in the beginning when Palau was only one island of Chediaur lived a man of gargantuan size (a rechad er Ngiwal a kmo ngochlimomo) with insatiable appetite (ng diak el sebechel mo medinges). As we all know the villagers ran out of food and became furious with Chuab because he was eating everything and leaving nothing for the village people. Needless to say, people of Chediaur were risking famine if Chuab was to continue living the way he did. Consequently, the solution to make the story short was the villagers had to end their misery by putting the problem, Chuab, on fire until he fell into smithereens (ng di mlo tebtebil).

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March 7, 2011

Necessary Evil

By Fuana Tmarsel

A few years ago while preparing to travel to the United States from United Kingdom (England), I was informed that I needed US Visa to enter the USA – that is without the visa I won’t be allowed to board the aircraft with a one way ticket to USA. The English are a bit ignorant in matters pertaining to our side of the world and numerous attempts to explain the “Special Relationship” we have with the US, proved futile as airlines remained adamant in their stand and insisted that I check with the US Embassy. The US Embassy in London is a huge building. The level floor wherein hopeful travelers to US were lined up waiting for their numbers to appear on the monitors, is quite vast. It was a good 45 minutes before 186 (my number) appeared on the screen.

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March 5, 2011

Saving FCB sends positive message to investors

By Jackson Henry

“Good investments are difficult to replicate. They are like pillars that support the roof. Without them, the roof will come crashing down”. These are the advise of an Economist who justified bailing out the banking behemoth, Citibank, during the crisis in 2008.

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March 4, 2011

The Color of Right

By Santy Asanuma

I feel sorry and cannot even begin to understand how life would be if I were born one of the Pingelapese afflicted with colorblindness. Oliver Sacks’ book titled The Island of the Colorblind brought this hereditary disease to the attention of the world. Imagine not being able to see colors red, green, and blue. Being a friend and big on thinking about matters that affect life, Dr. K gave me this book to read to see what I think.

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March 2, 2011

President’s worst Political Faux Pas

By Fuana Tmarsel

The recent Alien Registration strategy to milk few thousand dollars from some of the aliens here in Palau has to be the most asinine and absurd faux pas this administration has ever pitched; especially coming from the directive desk of our eloquent attorney president, who should know better than to pull such scheme ostentatiously stamped with discriminatory intent. Of course, we, the people no doubt appreciate the president’s effort to generate revenue and add to economic base for Palau, however such regulations which evidently discriminates against certain band of people only ruins the reputation of this country and make the president appear as arrogant bullyrag.

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