Archive for November, 2010

November 29, 2010

Palau Will Benefit From Limited Immigration

By Jackson Henry

The great Seal of the United States depicts an Eagle biting a banner inscribed with the Latin phrase, E Pluribus Unum, which means, “Out of many, one”. Although the phrase was first used in 1795, it is now the principle behind America’s policy of welcoming people from all over the world. Cultural diversity was believed to produce unity and strength. Today, we know that America’s immigration policy is one of the sources of its economic might. Many Palauans are beneficiary of America’s open door policy and have started new and prosperous lives by migrating to the good ole’ USA. Canada, England and Australia has gained economic strength through controlled immigration. 

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November 28, 2010

Melecha Ra Mdal (Putting A Face)

By Santy Asanuma

Fathers at best represent a sense of security for their children. As a young boy, I was reassured that nobody would transgress (diak omengull) against our home and family because my father was around. Not even the boys who were attempting to court my sisters dared to approach the house in sight of my father. Though I resigned to the fact that my father was elderly and very sickly at the end of his life and that it was best for him to move on to the next life, there was still that wish for things that could only be provided for by his presence.

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November 26, 2010

Thanks be to God

By Fuana Tmarsel

Thanksgiving is an annual national holiday marked by religious (particularly Christians) observances, and a traditional meal of turkey. For most people in the United States and former territories, the holiday commemorates the harvest festival celebrated by the Pilgrims in 1621. In the U.S it is celebrated on the fourth Thursday of November, but in Canada it is observed on the second Monday in October.

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November 24, 2010

A deer in headlights

By Kambes Kesolei

If one seeks to gain understanding on why the public have been adamant on more public discussions of the new compact agreement, will get a hint by reading the letter from Ambassador Joshua Koshiba, to Tia Belau with copies made to the news media, which was subsequently turned into a full page ad last week in Island Times newspaper.

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November 19, 2010

A Nation Paddling Backwards: We are not factories!

By Joleen Ngoriakl

Over the age of 80 and confined to a nursing home, Margaret Sanger learned of the landmark U.S. Supreme Court case, Griswold v. Connecticut; where the U.S. Supreme Court ruled the Connecticut law that prohibits contraceptives to be unconstitutional. This was year 1965, fifty-two years after Sanger witnessed a young patient die painfully from an “all-too-common” illegal abortion. From then on she devoted her life to reproductive rights and freedom to women, young and old.

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November 18, 2010

Banning contraceptives as a way to grow the population

I’m off-island at the moment so regular postings will commence after my return. In the meantime, the below bill was sent to me so I am passing it on to you.  Sulang – Kambes

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November 15, 2010

The Price of Prosperity

By Jackson Henry

A prison warden warned an inmate, “Unless you are prepared to pay for your freedom, stay in jail”. The warden’s point is freedom, like any good things in life, comes with a price. You have to pay for rent, food, transportation, utilities and you need to earn money to foot these expenses. On the contrary, the inmate can stay in jail and bear no expenses but at the price of giving up his precious freedom. 

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November 12, 2010

Blulak Ma Telingaol (Lie And Deceit)

By Santy Asanuma

I suspect that most modern Palauans today would take blulak and telingaol to be one and the same meaning. I was in luck to converse with a member of the Society of Historians the other day and looked into Palauan words and how they were formed ultimately setting their root meaning. I was surprised of the great difference between these two particular words that are now being used by us interchangeably (kaiseseuul el ua le di le kaisisiu el tekoi) as if they mean the same.

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November 10, 2010

Eleuid (Not In Place Or Order)

By Santy Asanuma

Palauan language is more succinct (kedeb e bleketakl) against prevailing attitude of the younger Palauan generation X and Y who tend to lean towards usage of English as more effective between the two. Palauan being graphic language uses imageries (a ikel de ues ra medad) to illustrate what is the intended meaning without giving room to multiple varying (kakerous) interpretation which can lead to confusion and ultimately erroneous conclusion of things.

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November 8, 2010

Prophets of the new age

By Jackson Henry

Fr. Fran Hezel referred to Ibedul Llouch as a prophet of the new age, because he was the epicenter of Palau’s paradigm shift and the seismic move toward modernity in the early 1900s. Prophets are prime movers. Whether by inspiration or by vision, they channel people’s energies toward one direction.

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November 6, 2010

Our Uncle’s Midterm Election and Us

By Joleen Ngoriakl

“Two years ago his vision inspired voters. Today the same man often sounds strangely bloodless. Back then his cool, self-assured composure impressed many, now the same character comes across as cold, arrogant, even elitist;” reports Süddeutsche Zeitung, a center-left German daily newspaper. Who wouldn’t? What president would not come across as “cold, arrogant, even elitist” after a cumbersome midterm election result (with the Republicans taking the House majority and governorships around the U.S., although not the Senate)?  The fact of the matter is the U.S.’s midterm election results are not just about America! As the world scuffles to climb out of the Great Recession (that began in the good ol’ U.S. of A), America is needed more than ever as the hegemonic power (that’s if it manages to stay in power) to make united and decisive decisions that can shape the global economy. This is not likely now that Washington will be divided; the Democrats pushing for state-led solutions while the Republicans/Tea Party push for a small government with less federal spending. In other words, a gridlocked Washington is in the forecast. This paralysis is probably what President Obama dreads.

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November 5, 2010

What is Islamic Banking?

Jackson M. Henry

This question was posed to me by a client who knows I dabbled in banking both on Guam and Palau. My reply was, “faith banking”. Yes, Islamic Banking is based on one of the principles of Islamic faith which prohibits profiting from interests on money.

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November 3, 2010

Reality Check?

By Santy Asanuma

Dear Senators and Delegates,

Please do not be afraid to come to the community and see for yourself the kind of struggles and sacrifices that we are going through. We do not know where to go until you make the policies to help us deal with our problems. In case you did not know that we know, you are the policy makers not the President. He only executes the laws made by OEK. Policy in simple explanation is basically direction.

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November 1, 2010

The Insurance Question

By Jackson M. Henry

Do you really need insurance? Ask a Certified Financial Planner (CFP), he will certainly insist on three indispensable items that you must have in your portfolio. One is a savings account to carry you up to 8 months in case you become unemployed. Second is investment for your future retirement. And third is insurance coverage in case of disaster, illness or accident. In this day and age, insurance is a necessity. Without it, a person risks early death or bankruptcy. Palau applauds the visions of those who crafted the idea into law. The real question now is affordability and timing of the program.

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