Archive for July, 2010

July 30, 2010

When the simple rule…..

By Fuana Tmarsel

The notion of understanding the Palauan political ethos conjures up thoughts of The Thinker – the nude sculpture by Auguste Rodin depicting a man, supposedly the Italian poet, Dante in somber meditation struggling with life’s baffling issues of identity, spirituality, hell, heaven, significance and etc. Perhaps I need to take the Thinker’s posture to gain understanding so I can at least capture the heart of today’s ethos.

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July 28, 2010

Melengakireng (Mending of Heart)

By Santy Asanuma

It is all in the root word and what action it is describing. Our ancestors used to “melengakl a iars malechub eng chaduo.” When the sail or thatch roof is worn out or broken, melengakl means to return to its original condition like when it was new. And above all, the action word is melongakl (to put on top) which implies the nature of importance.

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July 26, 2010

Chinese Tourism Transforming

By Jackson Henry

“Money knows no boundaries, race or creed”, said Investment guru Kumar Singh. Money will flow to every cracks and crevices in the world with open markets. This decade, the Chinese travelers will penetrate every destinations where they are welcomed. In the ancient city of Athens, a restaurant sign says, “Chinese welcomed here”. In Singapore, former PM Lee Kuan Yew said, “the only mistake I ever made was that I did not legalize casinos earlier”. Singapore’s Sentosa Integrated Resorts now caters to the growing Chinese tourists whose primary choice of activities are shopping and gambling. With big name operators like Steve Wynn and Sheldon Adleson, Singapore will give Macau a run for their money. 

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July 22, 2010

Cheliduid (The Unseen Force)

By Santy Asanuma

When the first gun fire exploded in Palau and the victim fell to the ground to a gruesome death with blood gushing out without being hit by a spear, great fear and confusion besieged the witnesses of this strange event. “Cheliduid” is an unseen strike by gods and that was the only conceivable explanation.

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July 21, 2010

Divide Template

By Fuana Tmarsel

Divide and rule or divide and conquer is an old strategic formula for gaining and maintaining power and control over subordinates or subjects by encouraging dissent and hostility between them.  Examples of these strategies can be seen during the British Raj in India, which consequently resulted with the nation of Pakistan. Then we have Vietnam which was divided by the French and later by the Soviet Communist with the North, and South by the United States.  Another country that still suffers from the split is that of Korea – North controlled by Communism, and the South allied with the United States. In short, these national divisions were bolstered by various ideological campaigns most notably the communism and democracy and their desire to achieve hegemony.

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July 20, 2010

Ngingaibudel El Chad (Easily Peeled)

By Santy Asanuma

A friend of mine in our recent meeting offered this term for me to ponder on. Ngingaibudel is dangerous person. This kind of a person should not be in charge of anything. There must be one person you know that changes position as compare to that of changing ones clothing on daily basis. And worse is it happens on the same issues. Since there are those who are louder than most and posses public official status, he/she is open to citizens to comment on their behavior publicly.

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July 13, 2010

What the House is up against

By Kambes Kesolei

Following OEK tradition, the House of Delegates is taking the first shot of next fiscal year’s annual government operating budget. Last year it was the Senate. The wish to avoid drawing attention to the recent pay raise awarded to the president and his cabinet got a little tougher for the House of Delegates with the drastic cuts being proposed for the fiscal year 2011 budget bill. The controversial salary raise introduced and pushed by the House of Delegates is a poignant reminder of today’s budget priorities.

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July 9, 2010

Courage

By Jackson Henry

“Life expands and shrinks according to one’s courage”, said Philosopher Anais Nin. England’s former PM Winston Churchill once said, “Courage is the greatest of all virtues; for upon it all others depend”.

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July 7, 2010

Television Babies

By Fuana Tmarsel

Recently, one of our local papers reported an increase of alcohol use among minors, saying it is greater than that of adults.  This reflects changes in our society –change in family values and even change in the method of parenting.Palau has undergone technological changes and with it, the emergence of a new culture – television babies.Our children are no longer isolated on a small island in the Pacific, but they have joined others in the world whose values and views are shaped by and through television lifestyles espousing and normalizingcarousing and lascivious pursuits.

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July 5, 2010

President Internet Kill Switch

By Santy Asanuma

A voice from Palau Island to the world. I am an idealist and will fight for human rights, free speech, freedom of choice and so forth to the death. However, I have never believed one bit that the speed of information so much tied to the initial fanfare and celebration on the eve of the Information Superhighway (internet) will make humanity any smarter or better than if it were without it. Consider the Internet as a mere tool; undoubtedly one of the most, if not the most, powerful one to reckon with today.

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July 2, 2010

Field of Dreams

By Jackson Henry

“If you build, they will come”, was the ethereal message behind the inspiring movie, Field of Dreams. The story took place in Dyersville, Iowa, where a farmer built a baseball diamond in the middle of his cornfield which was facing a foreclosure from the lending bank. Instead of selling the farm, the owner named Ray Kinsella, decided to build a baseball field defying the critics who said it will fail. After a slow start, the baseball field eventually succeeded. The ball field has come to symbolize human perseverance and that giving a second chance to people who have sacrificed all their life’s valuables, will result in success.

Field of Dreams has also become the “battle cry” for investment promoters and project developers in far flung areas that appear to be nothing more than a fantasy. I believe Palau’s first Field of Dreams is our tourism industry which was spearheaded by none other than Francis Toribiong, Bena Sakuma and George Ngirarsaol some 40 years ago. Today, Palau is embellished in this multi million industry that serves as our “taro and fish” economy.

But that was the first phase. The second phase now facing Palau is diversifying tourism attraction to bring in new breed to travelers. I believe diving is approaching its saturation point so Palau must stand up now and provide something different to dazzle our visitors. Since controlled gaming has stalled, then let us build the first Golf Course in Palau.

Golfing will guaranteed high end travelers and attract new breed to visitors. On Guam, nearly half a million Japanese come to enjoy the 13 private Golf Courses on the island and contributing to their $4 billion tourism industry annually. Golf in Palau can attract about 30,000 new visitors to bolster our yearly visitor count.

Due to our limited capital, the government must provide incentive and assistance to the private sector through a quasi partnership, in order for Palau to see its second Field of Dreams on our vast open lands on Babeldoab in a form of a world class Golf Course. If we build, they too will come.