Archive for April, 2010

April 29, 2010

President’s 2010 Annual Progress Report

Text of President Johnson Toribiong’s 2010 Annual Progress Report Delivered to the Senate and House of Delegates of the Eighth Olbiil Era Kelulau on April 26, 2010

Good morning.  Reklai, Ibedul, Bilung, Ebil Reklai, Mr. Senate President and Honorable Senators, Mr. Speaker and Honorable Delegates of the Eighth Olbiil Era Kelulau, Distinguished members of the Diplomatic Corp, Honored guests, my fellow Palauans, Ladies and Gentlemen.  Thank you for your attendance this morning to receive my annual report on the progress of my administration.

read more »

April 28, 2010

A call from our youth

By Kambes Kesolei

Each year, Youth Day comes and goes with all its usual fanfares – sporting events, environmental awareness activities, as well as its fitting timing with the schedule of education awareness week. Nothing in previous Youth Day observances has left us with an issue of youth concern to ponder. But this year was different. From March 13-15, thirty-eight youth delegates representing the states of Palau, the public and private high schools, and Palau Community College, met for three days at the 2010 Palau Youth Convention and issued a resolution with 60 recommendations to the leadership and the community that affects the youth in the area of education, health and social development, and advancements of youth’s livelihood in Palau.

read more »

April 26, 2010

A Bachel A Diak El Rellii A Urerel A Kldait

By Santy Asanuma

As a young boy my father once told me this adage that I have not heard anyone uttered up to this day. I did not really appreciate nor fully understood the usefulness of such wisdom. Now that I am grown up today (1961-2010) and have been corrupted by life experiences or both I am turning back to look at this human observation in much different light. Now it all make sense to me why people have to “merukem” (break into smaller pieces in literal meaning) their stone money usually bachel to take care of their customary obligation.

read more »

April 23, 2010

Verification & Authentication

By Jackson Henry

“Trust but verify”, was what former US President Reagan said during the 1980s nuclear arms negotiations with Russia. Reagan’s message brings to mind the importance of verifying information and authenticating documents. In this age of high-speed computers, scanners and precision printing, it is easy for scammers to fool people with “cooked up” papers.

read more »

April 21, 2010

Uidechetemel (Sticky Ground)

By Santy Asanuma

Why can’t anyone come and let us know what heaven is like? All the people that have died and gone to heaven must dearly love someone here on earth to try and make contact with them to let them know. My brother who died in 1977 and my father in 2004 should have tried to contact me. Heaven is Uidechetemel (sticky ground) I am beginning to believe. Just like here in Palau, when we sent someone to get words or bring the person to us and he or she never returns to let us know. We would say that he or she has gone to Uidechetemel. Whatever is on the other side must be more worthy of attention and interest. Nonetheless, I am sure our deceased loved ones are sending messages to us but we are not programmed to receive.

read more »

April 19, 2010

Supplemental budget fails to justify its need

By Kambes Kesolei

Last week’s rejection of the House supplemental budget by the Senate means that both houses’ respective budget committees are gearing up to meet to negotiate a compromise.

read more »

April 16, 2010

Sir Allen Stanford

By Jackson Henry

Allen Stanford was born on 3/24/50 in the small town of Mexia, Texas. In 1983, he opened a gym in Waco which went bankrupt. He escaped to Houston leaving his debts behind including a $31,800 judgment. In 1985, Allen opened a bank in Montserrat (Caribbean) but soon fled to Antigua after British crackdown on offshore banking. In Antigua, Allen opened Stanford International Bank, got favors from government officials and Bank Commissioner, Leroy King with bribes and gifts. Soon Allen got into a public “mud throwing” fight with Prime Minister Baldwin Spencer. 

read more »

April 14, 2010

Um Um Bem Tobed Ra Blim

By Santy Asanuma

The hermit crab is well secured in its shell to compensate for being probably one of the slowest creatures. But the strangest character of this shy creature is, when you to sing to it, it will crawl out of its shell. By singing to it “um um be mtobed ra blim…ba ngummm ba ngummm,” it will actually come out of its shell. This defies logic because um is very vulnerable (beot el metemall) away from the protection of its shell. Try it and the creature does respond every time you sing this same line to it.

read more »

April 12, 2010

The “Truth Squad” and the president’s decision

By Kambes Kesolei

Assessment of current issue or movement in government is the role played by political analysts. Dispensing forecasts and recommendations is their bread and butter. 

read more »

April 10, 2010

The Fruits of Friendship

By Jackson Henry

One of the most powerful forces in the world is not found at the point of guns or in the value money but rather in something we humans take occasionally for granted and that is friendship. Preachers tell us that friendship can move mountains, heal all wounds and nurture all souls. Religions around the world share a common mission of spreading friendship among man as the foundation for global peace and the human understanding. Without friendship being the cornerstone of international relations, no real economy can flourish. 

read more »

April 6, 2010

Ngeuil A Cheroll (Pain of Childbirth)

By Santy Asanuma

Men will never be equal with women not until they carry fetuses in their bellies for full term of nine months and sometimes a bit over due to complications. I remember one of the earliest standup comedy shows by Bill Cosby talking to the men in audience how painful is child birth. He told the men to grab their lower lip and pull it up way over to the back of their heads. And to do it quietly please.

read more »

April 5, 2010

Let’s not return to the old

By Kambes Kesolei

On the surface, the 8th OEK have not received much reprieve from the endless stream of criticisms – and deservedly so – aimed at the direction they have taken of prioritizing bills with dubious benefits to the people. But, to be fair, to say that every OEK member deserve each criticism would be remiss. Of the 29 lawmakers, we know of several members who are sincere in taking their constitutional duties and responsibilities of serving the people seriously. Noticeably, they demonstrate poise and depth on the floor, and provide the necessary counter-weight with high-degree of professionalism in the legislative body. And for that we count our blessings.

read more »

April 2, 2010

The Truth Shall Prevail

By Jackson Henry

When conflict erupts, the truth is the first casualty. Truth is simply the absence of falsehood. However, removing falsehood in business conflicts poses a challenge especially when the economic stakes are high. Although morally, we know that the truth will prevail, it is the initial distortion of the truth where the maximum damages occur. By the time the smoke clears and the public see the flag of truth flying high, we realize that the battlefield is littered with bodies and destruction. The danger lies when falsehood first wreaks havoc on innocent people before the truth emerges. 

read more »