Archive for December, 2009

December 23, 2009

Nobody’s Child

By Santy Asanuma

After receiving and talking with what seem to be an ocean of people all day long, the children all flocked to him with excitement. Of course they were all scolded and turned away considering that nobody after a full day’s work would like to be bothered by children. But the unexpected reprimand ensued against the grown ups for behaving this way. “Let the children come to me…for the kingdom of God is like these.” Wow we do not have to die to see heaven after all for all we have to do is look at the children. So let’s look at our children.

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December 22, 2009

A Fisherman’s Story

By Jackson M. Henry

In 1938, Koror was a thriving metropolitan city boasting modern Japanese retail stores, theaters, bicycle shops, Geisha Houses and Sushi Bars. The proprietor of Koror’s most popular Sushi Bar, named Tanaka San, out sourced the supply of fresh fish to a Palauan fisherman named Ngirangol. Ngirangol provided steady supply of fish caught in the lagoon around Koror for the insatiable appetite of the local Japanese for fresh Sashimi. Everyone was happy.

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December 21, 2009

‘TIS THE SEASON OF LOVE

By Fuana Tmarsel

Ever wonder why God started with the heavens and the earth before he created Adam and Eve. The Bible says that the earth was formless and empty and darkness was over the surface of the deep and the Spirit of God hovered over the waters and then he said, “Let there be light.” And there was light which separated it from darkness. And so he called light day, and darkness, he called night.

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December 18, 2009

History’s Greatest Transformation

By Jackson M. Henry

It is fortunate that in our lifetime, many Palauans witnessed history’s greatest economic transformation occur before our eyes, thanks to CNN. Yes, just 30 years ago, Deng Xiaoping turned this backward state controlled peasant country into an open and market driven tiger economy. Its 8% annual growth has defied the gravity of global downturn and remains the forerunner of industrialization and wealth creation. Its economic engine has freed over 500 million people from the bondage of poverty. This turn of event is one of humanity’s most inspiring saga and a profound story of economic liberalization the mind finds bewildering.

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December 16, 2009

DeWill (Jubilation Not Intoxication)

By Santy Asanuma

About this time of year for jubilation with only few days before Christmas in 2007 a boy in his innocence at a tender age of 14 and full of life’s promise was excited to ride his bicycle from downtown to his home in Ngesaol as the sun was setting to end another beautiful day. The joy of seeing the front lawn of the house he grew up in and seeing colorful Christmas bright lights inside the house and outside by the time he reached home. If only he was given a chance to reach this destination he thought was there all the time and easy to reach as he had always done before. And like all children, the sight and sound of a home beacon for the young to come to safety after sundown. And the voices of other siblings going about inside the house before dinner represent life as he knows it. And finally the call of his mother for him to leave his bicycle and come inside is a sound of love that cannot be mistaken. But this day was going to be different.

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December 14, 2009

Is the Congress ready for Democracy?

By Fuana Tmarsel

It’s on the lips of our political leaders. Lips that quickly summon ideals of democracy, yet seemingly possessing minds devoid of its notion, indeed not the understanding to practice it.

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December 11, 2009

Human Capital

By Jackson M. Henry

Of all the capital required for production, Human Capital (HC) stands out above the rest. For resource stricken countries like Palau, HC remains the strongest engine for economic growth. HC is defined as talent, skills and knowledge gained from education and experience that produces economic value. The higher the investment in HC equals the bigger the national economic output. Former Prime Minister Badawi brought this issue to President Toribiong during his visit to Palau, emphasizing the need for Palau to invest in its HC as the foundation for our economic development.

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December 9, 2009

The rightful veto: a victory at home

By Kambes Kesolei

Last Monday, President Johnson Toribiong vetoed the bill designed to open Palau to gambling activities. A bill hailed by few in OEK as solution for jobs and increase of minimum wage. Yet, no one is willing to answer where did the bill come from or who drafted it.

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December 7, 2009

Ongebitelulengall (At Sundown)

By Santy Asanuma

The notion that early Palauans had no sense of time before introduction of Seiko and Timex wrist watches goes to show our lack of appreciation and knowledge of how advanced and organized our society during pre-westerners era. “Ongebitelulengall” is about from 5:45 pm to 6:00 pm to mark the sun as it sinks on the surface of the ocean at the horizon. If you listen to our modern weather broadcast from National Weather Service, it announces the time for sunset in clock time but does not have a name for this particular occurrence.

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December 4, 2009

The Golden Goose

By Jackson M. Henry

A slave named Aesop told the story of the Golden Goose some 2,500 years ago in Greece. Aesop said a poor man and his wife owned a goose that lays a golden egg everyday. Despite the reliable daily golden egg, the couple decided that they were not getting rich fast enough. They also believed that the goose was full of gold. One day the husband convinced the wife to kill the goose and get all the gold inside the bird. So killed the goose and opened up its stomach hoping to achieve their dream of instant riches. However, they found out that the goose was just like any other bird with blood and organs but no gold. The Greek couple cried, not only because they did not get rich instantly but, because they could no longer enjoy daily golden eggs from their dead goose.

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December 2, 2009

Banakboub (Man Of No Fear)

By Santy Asanuma

This word is no longer heard in recent years. But “banakboub” is used to describe usually men and boys in doing the unimaginable feat (a ikel diak el mudasu malechub e ng sebechir a re chad el remuul). It is acceptable to be telling your young son as “banakboub” as to encourage him in accomplishing something difficult to do. In light of what is happening in our legal and justice system, I would like to declare this year with only one more month to go before its end as the year of “banakboub.”

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