November 17, 2013

A Teblo Ng Di 2 (Spirit of Belau Is Not In Numbers)

By Santy Asanuma —-

In Palauan “teblo” (two) is more than two. Palauan people do not rely on numbers but the heart (reng) of the idea. We do not like empirical science because it involves research and formal experiment which require being exact. Little wonder most of our students do not pursue studies in fields that require math and science of exactness. But when it comes to social sciences (tekoi ra reng me a deleuill er a rechad) that requires a lot of sentiments (aikel el di ultuil ra tekoi er a rengud me a uldesued). At one time in the past history of Palau in the 60’s, 70’s, and 80’s if you asked any high school seniors or the ones already in college what field of studies will they pursue, the most common answer was political science or other fields that require little or no math at all. Continue reading

November 17, 2013

Recent Discovery In Seaweeds Could Provide A New Industry For Palau

By Jackson M. Henry —-

A Feng Shui master who visited Palau in 2009 said, “The secret of Palau’s future prosperity lies under its blue ocean”. This prophecy could well come true soon with the recent scientific break through discoveries of certain healthy properties extracted from seaweeds by Dr. Haengwoo Lee which supposedly helps lower blood pressures and extend life up to extra 30 years. Continue reading

November 17, 2013

Informal Learning

By Fuana Tmarsel —-

Recently, my young neighbor was walking at the back of the house chanting, “ea ke mesesuau, eke mesesuau….”  I initially ignored his apparent rendition of a recent adult exchange at their house, but when the cantillana continued, I stretched my neck out the window and watched him dragging his skateboard while repeating the scornful adjectives. Because of age, I doubt he knew what the words meant, yet interested enough to have not only captured the words but also adding the tune for amusement as he goes about his business. Continue reading

November 15, 2013

Palau Needs A National Gallery Of Arts

By Jackson M. Henry —-

“Arts are the main force against the stagnation of society”, said artist Guisseppi Rafitanti.

Rafitanti’s statement is predicated on the truth that arts posses the power to stimulate the senses, evoke emotions and inspire people’s imaginations. Arts are self-expressions, creativity and imaginations of the artists freely unleashing their talents in societies where arts are appreciated. Even an African dictator once said that cultural arts posses the power to incite nationalism. Continue reading

November 15, 2013

Palau Becoming Of Age On World Stage

Tia Belau Editorial, November 4, 2013 —- 

After 19 years of independence, Palau seems to be gaining maturity – albeit slowly – in conducting its world affairs. Continue reading

November 15, 2013

What is the answer?

By Santy Asanuma —-

I have learned at this point in my life that simple questions like this cannot be answered let alone satisfy everyone’s expectations or understanding who heard the same answer. This is the work of great philosophers (thinkers) of our times and ones before them who wrote principles in books that we use today to understand education, medicine, natural laws, engineering, justice, cooking, playing and games, diseases, space, sex, politics, social behavior, and even religion as we allow them to operate and affect virtually every aspects of human life. But most people like you and me are not like Galileo, Shakespeare, Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas, or Einstein. We have not the brains or time for this. Continue reading

November 15, 2013

Worth er ngii

By Gaafar J. Uherbelau —-

Browsing online yesterday I came across a Lonely Planet article titled “Best beaches and small islands for travel in 2014”. Surprisingly I saw Palau first on the list which includes other places such as Trinidad & Tobago in the Caribbean, Sao Tome & Principe in Africa, Cook Islands, and Papua New Guinea to name a few. I say surprisingly because despite the fact that we’re consistently ranked among the best destinations in terms of diving, not much has been written about how Palau ranks overall as a tourism destination. Continue reading

November 13, 2013

2013 Koror State Election Results

The following results are still unofficial which doesn’t including absentee ballots.

Office of the Governor Continue reading

November 9, 2013

“Crabology”- The Study of Crab

Words from Orakidorm

By Stevenson Kuartei

 Going fishing a few days ago I had a hard time finding bags of ice at the stores and so I asked the attendant at Meyuns Causeway Shell, “why you no more ice”? He told me, “Ser, I am not sure but boss not bring di ice. Ser, becoz de water system is no more.” And then I realize the reason why there is shortage of ice in Koror. It was because of the OBF and the Wahoo Derby. But the intermittent water hours greatly contributed to the shortage of ice and that’s what my friend was telling me. I recall an article that I recently read about “Integrated Water Resources Management” which was authored by a couple of Palauans and a consultant from SOPAC. The Palauan authors were Ms. Metiek Ngirchechol and Ms. Lynna Thomas from the Palau EQPB. The article was titled, “Integrated Water Resources Management- Developing Integrated Water Resource Management in the Republic of Palau.” The article of course can speak for itself but what was more impressive to me are the “References” at end of the article. Several of the cited articles stand out because they are authored by Palauans such as, A. Eledui, I.U. Olkeriil, Y. Golbuu and D.O. Otobed. In particular are a couple of sources about “Water Security and Safety” the very issue that we need to pursue as the ultimate goal for our national water policies.  Continue reading

November 9, 2013

Expensive Travel for State Elected Leaders

By Kambes Kesolei —-

While deep scrutiny and media coverage was placed on the $30,000 spent by six members of the 9th OEK for VAT study in Cook Islands and New Zealand, however, in comparison,  little inspection has been made to the $70,000 travel money budgeted by the members of the 9th Koror State Legislature for fiscal year 2013. Continue reading

November 9, 2013

Leng uaisei?

By Gaafar J. Uherbelau —-

A couple of nights ago while waiting to use the ATM at one of the banks in Koror a couple of students we assumed were between 7-10 years old walked past. It was already past 8pm and they were still in their KES uniforms, walking around without an adult with them. One of them stopped near a guy who was waiting in line and asked, “Me tara change. Lak maisei e brad, kau tial el oltobed a udoud.” The man refused to give them money. Continue reading

November 9, 2013

Cloud Computing Will Elevate Palau’s Educational Standards

By Jackson M. Henry —-

Many of our elderly Palauan Rock & Rolls aficionados still love The Rolling Stones popular hit, “Get off my cloud”, which was commonly heard broadcasted from radio station WSZB back in the 1970s. Today, the word “cloud” is the new buzzword for IT pros and techno buffs in Palau because it is said to be the next big stage in the internet revolution. Continue reading

November 1, 2013

Silence, the biggest killer in the Pacific!

Words from Orakidorm

By Stevenson Kuartei

Two days ago (Oct. 19) here in American Samoa, the LBJ Tropical Medical Center, their only hospital, and the Department of Health held a medical symposium, the first one ever between the two entities. The morning topic was on the burden of Diabetes in the Territory and in the afternoon was series of topics on human resource development in health. The data shared in the morning by the local presenters was overwhelming. For example, the rate of Diabetes in the Territory is 47% and youngest person was 12 years old. The cost of taking care of it is skyrocketing and the rates of off-island referral and hemodialysis are increasing every year. As I thought about this, I could not help but feel this sadness because the very same thing is happening in Palau. Continue reading

November 1, 2013

Siasing er kid

By Gaafar J. Uherbelau —-

So the past couple of weeks I’ve been critical about our nation, trying to shed light on issues that I believe need our attention. But I also think we need to take time to acknowledge some interesting facts about our nation as well as our achievements over the years since our beginnings as a republic. Continue reading

November 1, 2013

Defusing Loan Stressors in Palau

By Jackson M. Henry —-

Life on Palau, in the eyes of our foreign visitors impervious to Palauan cultural duties, is probably the closest they see an ideal society similar to what British author, Sir Thomas More wrote in his famous book, Utopia. Life on a paradise island appears free of the stresses that come with big city living. Continue reading

November 1, 2013

HCF is big and good policy

Tia Belau Editorial, October 16, 2013 —- 

History tells us that it is too much to expect every government to finish up its term with a profound public policy that improves social and economic circumstances of its citizens. Continue reading

November 1, 2013

Thank you, Oreor!!!

By Fuana Tmarsel —-

Happy Anniversary to Oreor and the people of Oreor!  Thank you for the many years you have given us a place on which to build our dwelling, to finish our elementary and secondary education. As a young child, Oreor was a place of fascination – where I first saw a motor cycle, a pick-up truck, and ice box. I remember the man on a motor cycle who sold red ice-keki and tama. As I look back on my childhood, I recall the trips my father took to Oreor. On the day of his return,  I would run to the hill and watch his boat approach our shore, expecting to hear news of Oreor. Little did I know that one of those days, I was to make a trip to Oreor to stay. Continue reading

October 18, 2013

Omelouch (Giving best bites to children)

By Santy Asanuma —-

Who makes a nation? Is it the government or the people? Some of the children, who were born up to the 1980’s, might have been fed as babies through the cultural practice of “omelouch.” Usually parents or grandparents of a child would chew food in their mouth to soften and make it suitable for the baby to eat during every meal time. Before you go into convulsion out of disgust be reminded that presidents, vice-presidents, senators, delegates, doctors, lawyers, principals/teachers, judges, chiefs, business owners, and most of our high and mighty citizens today were fed through this practice. Continue reading

October 18, 2013

“Not in OrderS”

 

Words from Orakidorm

By Stevenson Kuartei 

Traveling to American Samoa to assist the Director of Health, I have had to stay in hotels. One day I went to the restroom and there was a sign in the toilet, which said, “Not in Orders”. Of course, I am not a primary an English speaker and so I am not in a position to criticize. But normally the sign for non-functioning toilet is usually written, “Not in Order”. Just a change of one letter and my impression changed. “Not in Orders” with an “s” seems to allude to not one, but many “not in order” in the future.

While I am contemplating on this issue of “Not in Orders”, the news about United States Government shutdown and hitting the Fiscal Cliff is constantly being discussed on news outlets and the impact this will have on the world economy. Even the American Samoan Government has designed a 3-month roll out plan on releasing government workers in case their budget doesn’t come in on time. It is painful to sit with the Director of Health and have him explain who are the people in the Department of Health that will be released. Even if there is an agreement between the US President and Congress, it will be a short-term band-aid solution. Now, the United States is the most sophisticated country in the world in terms of governance structure and the world’s leading economy. If they were to close the government for long and if they were to default on their loan, the affect on the world economy will be devastating according to the leading world economists.

In Palau, the recent budget is probably the highest budget we have seen in our brief history as a nation. We know that at best our local revenue is worth less than $40M US and so we are increasing taxes to make up the difference. But these taxes are levied against an overall economy that is supported by financial aid from overseas. So how’s that work? Are the overseas financial aids that we receive independent of this “Not in Orders” that we see taking place in the most sophisticated countries in the world including the United States? My unsophisticated mind is now really confused. I am confused when austerity measures are hitting various governments of the world (EU), Jasmine Revolution is hitting others (Arab League) due to inequality of access to benefits of governance and “Not in Orders” hitting 1st World Countries most of whom give us the foreign aids, yet we are increasing our annual budget. Really? How does that work?

Perhaps the “Not in Orders” was just a typo. You think so? I think it was deliberate by the hotel housekeeping staff because they were instructed by their manager who had been ordered to do so by the Corporate Office in the Mainland, US. You see this is just a toilet economics. If you do not use the toilet, you save money from the water used for flushing, you save money from the soap used for washing, save money from the paper towel used for drying your hands and from the floor mopping for the “off target” stuff. I think I like this “Not in Orders” typo. In light of what is happening globally and in our donor countries, may be “Not in Orders” in our budget process could end up being a live saver. Let’s just pretend it was typo. What do you think? I say we put a big sign up, “NOT IN ORDERS”.

October 17, 2013

Keng keng

By Gaafar U. Uherbelau —-

One step forward, two steps back. This is exactly how I see things beginning to look in our nation. Whenever it seems that we’re making progress, climbing up a level, somehow we trip and fall back down and sometimes we even land farther than we were when we started climbing. And the irony of it all is that we are the ones tripping ourselves. Continue reading

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